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the_middle_assyrian_period [2016/04/22 22:19]
wagensonner [The Middle Assyrian period]
the_middle_assyrian_period [2016/04/22 22:28] (current)
wagensonner [The Middle Assyrian period]
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 All being considered, the Middle Assyrian lexical texts appear to be well-executed copies of lists imported from Babylonia. Whether the so-called "Emesal Vocabulary" also was first created in Babylonia and subsequently found its way to Assyria cannot be determined with the present state of knowledge. An interesting feature of the Middle Assyrian lexical corpus is also the comparatively high density of manuscripts belonging to the legal phrasebook //Ana ittišu//. \\ All being considered, the Middle Assyrian lexical texts appear to be well-executed copies of lists imported from Babylonia. Whether the so-called "Emesal Vocabulary" also was first created in Babylonia and subsequently found its way to Assyria cannot be determined with the present state of knowledge. An interesting feature of the Middle Assyrian lexical corpus is also the comparatively high density of manuscripts belonging to the legal phrasebook //Ana ittišu//. \\
  
-As mentioned above, both lexical and literary texts bear colophons. Colophons are already attested much earlier in the Mesopotamian textual record, but the Middle Assyrian period for the first time provides more detailed information on the scribes involved and the provenience of the source material. The sons of the royal scribe Ninurta-uballissu are particularly careful with their colophons, as the subsequent example of [[http://cdli.ucla.edu/P282494|VAT 8875]]:\\+As mentioned above, both lexical and literary texts bear colophons. Colophons are already attested much earlier in the Mesopotamian textual record, but the Middle Assyrian period for the first time provides more detailed information on the scribes involved and the provenience of the source material. The sons of the royal scribe Ninurta-uballissu are particularly careful with their colophons, as the subsequent example of [[http://cdli.ucla.edu/P282494|VAT 8875]] demonstrates:\\ 
 + 
 +{{ ::ai6ma.png?direct&400|}} 
 + 
 +\\ 
 + 
 +(double ruling) MAN BE MAN\\ 
 +(catch line) \\ 
 +(blank space)\\ 
 +7th tablet of **ki-ulutin-bi-še<sub>3</sub>** //a-na it-ti//-[//šu//]\\ 
 +In total: 180 are its lines.\\ 
 +It is complete. It is checked. Copy from Nippur.\\ 
 +Hand of Marduk-balāssu-ēreš, young scribe,\\ 
 +son of Ninurta-uballissu, royal scribe.\\ 
 +By the name of Aššur my written name you must not erase!\\ 
 +(blank space)\\ 
 +(Date formula)\\
  
-{{ ::ai6ma.png?direct&300 |}} 
  
  
the_middle_assyrian_period.1461359969.txt.gz · Last modified: 2016/04/22 22:19 by wagensonner
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