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2013_publications [2015/09/25 16:34]
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2013_publications [2019/11/04 11:56] (current)
lynn [2013]
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 ===== 2013 ===== ===== 2013 =====
 +
 +** Rituals ** 
 +
 +//Title//: Ambos, C., and L. Verderame, //Approaching Rituals in Ancient Cultures. Questioni di rito: rituali come fonte di conoscenza delle religioni e delle concezioni del mondo nelle culture antiche . LXXXVI. 2 SUPPLEMENTI ALLA «RIVISTA DEGLI STUDI ORIENTALI»//, Pisa: Fabrizio Serra Editore, 2013.
 +
 +//Keywords//: building rituals - ideological function - find spots - 1st millennium BC - rites of passage - ancient - changing status -  moving - space - bīt rimki - substitute king - ritual - Hathor - reception - royal - divine rituals - Egypt - river - oven - garden - female body - fertility - Late Babylonian - figurines - embodiment - gender studies - beggar on the threshold - social identity  - Homer - Homeric epic -rites of passage - ritual syntax - Emar - queen - Ancient Israel - art - visual arts  grammar of rituals - sensory dimension - Akkadian rituals - ritualisation of war - bellum - sacral implications
 +
 +//Abstract//: Ritual, in the past decades, has gained a central role in the study of religions and societies, and so has achieved the status of an independent and inter-/cross-disciplinary field of research. Ritual studies have proposed new and stimulating interpretative theories and approaches, which, however, only partially satisfy the needs of scholars working in the area of ancient civilizations. This is due to the fact that these theories are often derived from scientific disciplines, for example anthropology, which leave the historical dimension separate or limited to the recent past. Scholars of ancient civilizations are working from different perspectives, insofar as they have to draw on archaeological and written evidence from long-gone cultures. It was the aim of this conference: to stimulate a fruitful scientific exchange between young scholars from different disciplines working on rituals dealing with ancient cultures, such as Assyriology, Ancient Near Eastern Archaeology, Egyptology, or Classical Studies. All these fields can draw on diverse archaeological and written sources, and also research cultures that are characterized by a longue durée of centuries or even millennia. Both in chronological and geographical respects, the articles published in this volume cover a vast area: Ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Syria, Israel, Anatolia, Greece and the Phoenicians in the Mediterranean area. 
 +
 +** Ras Shamra XXI, Études ougaritiques III **
 +
 +//Title//: Matoïan, V. and M. Al-Maqdissi, //Etudes ougaritiques III//, Paris: Editions recherche sur les civilisations, 2013. 
 +
 +//Keywords//: Ras Shamra - Ras Ibn Hani - Bronze Age - buildings - architecture - irrigation - technology - construction - results of surveys
 +
 +//Abstract//: Les Études ougaritiques III, volume XXI de la série Ras Shamra - Ougarit, est un ouvrage collectif - rassemblant les contributions de vingt-huit auteurs. Les études présentées portent sur les deux sites voisins de Ras Shamra et de Ras Ibn Hani, localisés sur le littoral syrien à quelques kilomètres au nord de la ville de Lattaquié. 
 +Une première partie comporte quinze textes relatifs à des recherches menées dans le cadre de la Mission archéologique syro-française de Ras Shamra - Ougarit (Ministère français des Affaires étrangères, Direction générale des Antiquités et des Musées de Syrie). Les résultats portent principalement sur l'âge du Bronze et, pour l'essentiel, sur la période du Bronze récent. Ils concernent, d'une part, des travaux de terrain (études de plusieurs bâtiments et d'aménagements hydrauliques, analyses des techniques de construction) et, d'autre part, des études du matériel archéologique et épigraphique, avec la présentation de pièces inédites, provenant des fouilles en cours ainsi que de l'exploration ancienne du tell de Ras Shamra et du site de Minet el-Beida. 
 +Dans une seconde partie, quatre articles portent sur Ras Ibn Hani. Le premier présente les résultats d'un sondage mené à Ibn Hani en 1987, qui a permis de mettre en évidence une occupation du Bronze ancien dans le secteur. Puis, trois rapports préliminaires relatifs à la campagne de fouille, menée en 2011 par la Direction générale des Antiquités et des Musées de Syrie sur le site de Ras Ibn Hani, apportent de nouvelles données sur l'occupation de ce secteur, du Bronze récent à l'époque byzantine. ([[http://www.peeters-leuven.be/toc/9789042930179.pdf|table of content]])
 +
 +** Vicino oriente 17**
 +
 +//Title//: Università di Roma, Istituto di studi del Vicino oriente, //Vicino Oriente XVII//, 2013. 
 +
 +//Keywords//: Gherardo Gnoli - Estakhr - Istakhr - Sasanian settlements - early Islamic settlements - north of the Persian Gulf - Motya - Phoenician Motya - Motya graveyard - earliest sttlements in Motya - Khirbet al-Batrawy - potter’s wheels - Tell el-'Ajjul - metal weapons - Hittite historiography - poetic style - sumerogram IR - Hittite
 +
 +//Content//: 
 +
 +
 +P. Gignoux - //Souvenirs d'un grand savant: Gherardo Gnoli (1937-2012)// 
 +
 +N.N.Z. Chegini - M.V. Fontana - A. Asadi - M. Rugiadi - A.M. Jaia - A. Blanco - L. Ebanista - V. Cipollari, //Estakhr Project - second preliminary report of the joint Mission of the Iranian Center for Archaeological Research, the Parsa-Pasargadae Research Foundation and the Sapienza University of Rome, Italy// 
 +
 +A. Asadi - S.M. Mousavi Kouhpar - J. Neyestani - A. Hojabri-Nobari - //Sasanian and Early Islamic settlement patterns north of the Persian Gulf// 
 +
 +L. Nigro - //Before the Greeks: the earliest Phoenician settlement in Motya - recent discoveries by Rome «La Sapienza» Expedition// 
 +
 +C. Fiaccavento - //Potters' wheels from Khirbet al-Batrawy: a reconsideration of social contexts// 
 +
 +D. Montanari - //A copper javelin head in the UCL Palestinian Collection //
 +
 +A. Massafra - //A group of metal weapons from Tell el-'Ajjul in the Hunterian Museum, University of Glasgow// 
 +
 +A. Campus - //Costruire memoria e tradizione: il tofet// 
 +
 +F. Spagnoli - //Demetra a Mozia: evidenze dall'area sacra del Kothon nel V secolo a.C.// 
 +
 +R. Francia - //Lo stile 'poetico' delle historiolae ittite// 
 +
 +V. Pisaniello - //Il sumerogramma IR nei testi ittiti//
  
 **Syrian Archaeology** **Syrian Archaeology**
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 //Keywords//: text publication //Keywords//: text publication
  
-//Abstract//: Translation, transliteration and commentary on economic and literary texts from ancient Sumer in Mesopotamia from the middle of the 3rd millennium BCE. These, previously unpublished texts, are some of the very earliest cuneiform texts in existence. +//Abstract//: Translation, transliteration and commentary on economic and literary texts from ancient Sumer in Mesopotamia from the middle of the 3rd millennium BC. These, previously unpublished texts, are some of the very earliest cuneiform texts in existence. 
  
 **Ebla and its Landscape** **Ebla and its Landscape**
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 //Keywords//: text edition - myth - literature //Keywords//: text edition - myth - literature
  
-//Abstract//: The Myth of Nergal and Ereškigal, preserved in two versions, a Middle-Babylonian one from Tell el-Amarna and a much longer Standard Babylonian one probably composed in Assyria in the early first millennium BCE, tells the story of why and how Nergal, son of Ea, the god of wisdom, descended into the Netherworld by the “ladders of heaven,” fell in love with Ereškigal, queen of the Netherworld, and eventually deposed her and usurped her throne. Like all Mesopotamian myths, the story is replete with enigmatic details, puns and intertextual allusions making it a heavily encoded text with hidden levels of interpretation. In allegorical reading, the myth was a complement to the Descent of Ištar (SAACT 6), and the mission of Nergal could be associated with that of the king as a heavenly savior sent to the rescue of the sinners. This volume provides an in-depth analysis of the myth and the most complete reconstruction of the Standard Babylonian version yet presented. The reconstructed text is given both in cuneiform and in up-to-date transliteration and translation, complete with a critical apparatus, philological commentary, and a full glossary and sign list. The Introduction also contains an edition and discussion of the Amarna version and an extensive study of the god Nergal in Assyrian sources. Ideal both as a textbook for classroom use and as a resource for non-Assyriologists wishing to study the myth first-hand.+//Abstract//: The Myth of Nergal and Ereškigal, preserved in two versions, a Middle-Babylonian one from Tell el-Amarna and a much longer Standard Babylonian one probably composed in Assyria in the early first millennium BC, tells the story of why and how Nergal, son of Ea, the god of wisdom, descended into the Netherworld by the “ladders of heaven,” fell in love with Ereškigal, queen of the Netherworld, and eventually deposed her and usurped her throne. Like all Mesopotamian myths, the story is replete with enigmatic details, puns and intertextual allusions making it a heavily encoded text with hidden levels of interpretation. In allegorical reading, the myth was a complement to the Descent of Ištar (SAACT 6), and the mission of Nergal could be associated with that of the king as a heavenly savior sent to the rescue of the sinners. This volume provides an in-depth analysis of the myth and the most complete reconstruction of the Standard Babylonian version yet presented. The reconstructed text is given both in cuneiform and in up-to-date transliteration and translation, complete with a critical apparatus, philological commentary, and a full glossary and sign list. The Introduction also contains an edition and discussion of the Amarna version and an extensive study of the god Nergal in Assyrian sources. Ideal both as a textbook for classroom use and as a resource for non-Assyriologists wishing to study the myth first-hand.
  
 **Thus Speaks Ishtar of Arbela** **Thus Speaks Ishtar of Arbela**
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 //Keywords//: ancient Israel - history - warfare //Keywords//: ancient Israel - history - warfare
  
-//Abstract//: Bound for Exile, the companion volume of The Raging Torrent, presents a collection of cuneiform texts that relate to the Israelites and Judeans living under the yoke of the great Mesopotamian empires during the 8th-6th centuries BCE.  +//Abstract//: Bound for Exile, the companion volume of The Raging Torrent, presents a collection of cuneiform texts that relate to the Israelites and Judeans living under the yoke of the great Mesopotamian empires during the 8th-6th centuries BC.  
  
 **Rituales Hititas** **Rituales Hititas**
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 //Keywords//: Persian - architecture - art - archaeology //Keywords//: Persian - architecture - art - archaeology
  
-//Abstract//: The palace complex of the Persian King Darius I, the Great (522-486 BCE), provides unique evidence of the sophistication of Achaemenid architecture and construction. This palace, built 2500 years ago in western Iran, lay at the centre of the Persian Empire that stretched from the Nile and the Aegean to the Indus Valley. First rediscovered in 1851, the palace of Darius was partly excavated over the next century. But it was only field research between 1969 and 1979 by the noted French archaeologist Jean Perrot which revealed the site’s full dimension and complexity. Its bull-headed capitals, enamel friezes of richly-clad archers holding spears, figures of noble lions and winged monsters, introduced a new iconography into the ancient Persian world. The discovery and excavation of the palace, which this book records, thus casts a new light on the beginnings of the Achaemenid period. Edited by the distinguished scholar of ancient Persia, John Curtis, the lavishly illustrated volume is a work of seminal importance for the understanding of ancient Persia, likely to be radically altered by Perrot’s research and findings.+//Abstract//: The palace complex of the Persian King Darius I, the Great (522-486 BC), provides unique evidence of the sophistication of Achaemenid architecture and construction. This palace, built 2500 years ago in western Iran, lay at the centre of the Persian Empire that stretched from the Nile and the Aegean to the Indus Valley. First rediscovered in 1851, the palace of Darius was partly excavated over the next century. But it was only field research between 1969 and 1979 by the noted French archaeologist Jean Perrot which revealed the site’s full dimension and complexity. Its bull-headed capitals, enamel friezes of richly-clad archers holding spears, figures of noble lions and winged monsters, introduced a new iconography into the ancient Persian world. The discovery and excavation of the palace, which this book records, thus casts a new light on the beginnings of the Achaemenid period. Edited by the distinguished scholar of ancient Persia, John Curtis, the lavishly illustrated volume is a work of seminal importance for the understanding of ancient Persia, likely to be radically altered by Perrot’s research and findings.
  
 **Linguistic Studies** **Linguistic Studies**
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 //Keywords//: military history - Neo-Assyria - imperialism- religion  //Keywords//: military history - Neo-Assyria - imperialism- religion 
  
-//Abstract//: Walter Mayer’s second volume dedicated to the relationship of Assyria and Urartu during the 1st mill. BCE presents the Assyro-Urartian bilingual texts of Urartian origin. Mostly found on stelae erected on exceptional places – regarding political and regional significance – the texts supplement and modify the historical information given in royal inscriptions. Additionally, they are of invaluable worth for analysing the Urartian lexicon. All texts are provided with independent translations of the Assyrian and the Urartian texts, philological commentaries and further background information. The volume is supplemented by an outline of the Neo-Assyrian of Urartu and extensive lists of all words and names, which enable further research.+//Abstract//: Walter Mayer’s second volume dedicated to the relationship of Assyria and Urartu during the 1st mill. BC presents the Assyro-Urartian bilingual texts of Urartian origin. Mostly found on stelae erected on exceptional places – regarding political and regional significance – the texts supplement and modify the historical information given in royal inscriptions. Additionally, they are of invaluable worth for analysing the Urartian lexicon. All texts are provided with independent translations of the Assyrian and the Urartian texts, philological commentaries and further background information. The volume is supplemented by an outline of the Neo-Assyrian of Urartu and extensive lists of all words and names, which enable further research.
  
 **Cambridge History, Ancient Religions** **Cambridge History, Ancient Religions**
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 //Keywords//: cities - memory - ideology - Iron Age - society - archaeology - architecture - environment //Keywords//: cities - memory - ideology - Iron Age - society - archaeology - architecture - environment
  
-//Abstract//: This book investigates the founding and building of cities in the ancient Near East. The creation of new cities was imagined as an ideological project or a divine intervention in the political narratives and mythologies of Near Eastern cultures, often masking the complex processes behind the social production of urban space. During the Early Iron Age (ca.1200–850 BCE), Assyrian and Syro-Hittite rulers developed a highly performative official discourse that revolved around constructing cities, cultivating landscapes, building watercourses, erecting monuments and initiating public festivals. This volume combs through archaeological, epigraphic, visual, architectural and environmental evidence to tell the story of a region from the perspective of its spatial practices, landscape history and architectural technologies. It argues that the cultural processes of the making of urban spaces shape collective memory and identity as well as sites of political performance and state spectacle.+//Abstract//: This book investigates the founding and building of cities in the ancient Near East. The creation of new cities was imagined as an ideological project or a divine intervention in the political narratives and mythologies of Near Eastern cultures, often masking the complex processes behind the social production of urban space. During the Early Iron Age (ca.1200–850 BC), Assyrian and Syro-Hittite rulers developed a highly performative official discourse that revolved around constructing cities, cultivating landscapes, building watercourses, erecting monuments and initiating public festivals. This volume combs through archaeological, epigraphic, visual, architectural and environmental evidence to tell the story of a region from the perspective of its spatial practices, landscape history and architectural technologies. It argues that the cultural processes of the making of urban spaces shape collective memory and identity as well as sites of political performance and state spectacle.
  
 **Ancient Writing** **Ancient Writing**
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