Most Important Cuneiform Objects 31-40

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31. How to read signs (diri:SI.A : watru prisms)

An important tool for modern scholars attempting to attach phonetic values to Sumerian signs. More information...

Artifact: Clay tablet
Provenience:
Period: Old Babylonian (ca. 1900-1600 BC)
Current location: Ashmolean Museum, Oxford (Ashm 1923-401)


32. Tiglath-pilesar's annalistic text

Featuring in the famous 19th century decipherment challenge of the Royal Asiatic Society, independent translations of this text 'proved' that cuneiform texts were once again readable, after two thousand years of obscurity. More information...

Artifact: Clay prism
Provenience: Assur
Period: Middle Assyrian (ca. 1400-1000 BC)
Current location: Vorderasiatisches Museum, Berlin


33. The Succession Treaty of Essarhadon

Esarhaddon's treaty to establish Aššurbanipal as his successor to the throne of Assyria in the seventh century BC. More information...

Artifact: Clay tablet
Provenience:
Period: Neo-Assyrian (ca. 911-612 BC)
Current location:


34. The Descent of Ishtar to the Netherworld

This Akkadian poem tells the myth of the descent of Ishtar, goddess of love, fertility, and war, into the Netherworld and her resurrection. More information...

Artifact: Clay tablet
Provenience: Nineveh
Period: Neo-Assyrian (ca. 911-612 BC)
Current location: British Museum, London


35. The Taylor Prism (Sennacherib’s siege of Jerusalem)

Sennacherib's annals, including a description of the siege of Jerusalem which can be compared and contrasted with the biblical account. More information...

Artifact: Clay prism
Provenience: Nineveh
Period: Neo-Assyrian (ca. 911-612 BC)
Current location: British Museum, London


© The Trustees of the British Museum | 36. A Tablet on Epilepsy

An important Neo-Babylonian manuscript of a medical treatise that gives detailed descriptions of epilepsy. More information...

Artifact: Clay tablet
Provenience:
Period: Neo-Babylonian (ca. 626-539 BC)
Current location: British Museum, London


37. Venus tablet of Ammisaduqa

A scholarly text providing astronomical observations of the planet Venus. More information...

Artifact: Clay tablet
Provenience: Nineveh
Period: Neo-Assyrian (ca. 911-612 BC)
Current location: British Museum, London


38. The Tale of the Poor Man of Nippur

Humour, violence, poverty, and a goat in an Akkadian folk-tale. More information...

Artifact: Clay tablet
Provenience: Sultantepe
Period: Neo-Assyrian (ca. 911-612 BC)
Current location: Archaeological Museum, Ankara


39. Sargon's Birth Legend

The story of a baby sent down-river in a basket at birth, destined to become king. More information...

Artifact: Clay tablet
Provenience: Nineveh
Period: Neo-Assyrian (ca. 911-612 BC)
Current location: British Museum, London (K 03401 + Sm 2118)


40. A bilingual statue from Tell Fekherye

A statue with a bilingual inscription in Akkadian and Aramaic that sheds light on the interaction between these two languages in the Neo-Assyrian period. More information...

Artifact: Basalt statue
Provenience: Tell Fekherye
Period: Neo-Assyrian
Current location:

objects31to40.txt · Last modified: 2016/09/27 11:43 by dahl
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